So nice to have this aerial view of Broadwas Court and it emphasis the size of the grounds (many thanks to Peter Walker) I never knew that they had a foot bridge crossing the River Teme, I don't know if this still exists but I find it quite fascinating that they had one. Also the garden feature, which again I did not know of or if still exists or not.

The next village is Doddenham before you come to Knightwick. The Dean and Chapter of Worcester, or rather the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, are the lords of this manor, and Mr. F. E. Williams and Mr. John Freeman are the chief landowners (1800's).

I think this photograph would have been taken when the Court was owned by Edward Henry Hill and more information about him can be found in the drop down windows below. Also there is a window in the Broadwas Church dedicated to him, which can be found in the South wall of the Chapel.

Edward Henry Hill was married to Agnes Elizabeth Bailey. Their marriage took place at St. George's, Worcester on 1st June, 1870.
They lived at Broadwas Court and are both buried at Broadwas Church.

 

Evans - Hill - Lineage - 1700 - 1900's

 

Here is an interesting family tree, showing where the Evans family, in generation #5, have Mary Hilditch Evans, marrying Thomas Rowley Hill of Stourport, Worcester. One of their children was Edward Henry Hill. [Many thanks to Catherine Stallybrass for all this information].

This all helps with showing how the two family names became the well known Hill & Evans Vinegar Company in Worcester.

Also see this pdf - all about the Evans family

Generation #1

Thomas Evans (Son of ?)
Born: c. 1700
Married: c. 1720 to Elizabeth Field, [Daughter of: Thomas Field (Senior) of Tirymynech and Mary (who died 1735)].

NOTE: This Thomas Evans lived in Tirymynech, Wales in 1721, in Welshtown in 1731 and in 1735 purchased freehold property in Pool (later to be called Welshpool).

NOTE: This may be the same Thomas Evans or perhaps the son of a Thomas Evans who, in 1717 was owner of "the Farm", often called Dyer's, as shown in the Powis rent roll of 1717.

Children of Thomas Evans and Elizabeth Field:

1. Thomas Evans, baptised, 1721. (*see below)
2. Field Evans, baptised, June 18, 1731 at Pool, married Miss Humphreys
3. John Evans born c. 1734

Generation #2

*Thomas Evans (Son of, Thomas Evans and Elizabeth Field)
Born: 1721.
Married (1): Rachel Joyce
Married (2): April 25, 1760 to Elizabeth Jones, daughter of, John Jones of Trewern (and earlier Varchwell) & ? (Elizabeth died October 22, 1824, aged 83 and is buried at Guilsfield).
Died: January 23, 1766.
Buried: Under the Powis family seat in the Welshpool Church with the permission of the Earl of Powis.

Children of Thomas Evans and Elizabeth Jones:

1. Thomas Evans, born c. 1762 (**see below)

Generation #3

**Thomas Evans (son of, Thomas Evans and Elizabeth Jones)
Born: 1762.
Baptized: Welshpool church
Married: Grace Sugden, daughter of, John Sugden of Greystones near Halifax. (Grace Sugden died February 17, 1796)
Died: February 21, 1829.

NOTE: This Thomas Evans was the Co-founder of Congregationalism in Welshpool

Children of Thomas Evans and Grace Sugden:

1. Thomas Evans, born March 2, 1786, married Hannah Bickerton of Oswestry.
2. ***John Evans, born October 20, 1787 (see below)
3. Edward Evans, born July 10, 1789 (see below)
4. Elizabeth Evans, born 1785, married Morris Jones of Gungrog.
5. Mary Evans, born July 9, 1791, married Richard Powell of Oswestry
6. Sarah Evans, born 1796, married Thomas Pryce of Oswestry
7. ?, born 1796, died in infancy

Generation #4

***John Evans (Son of, Thomas Evans and Grace Sugden)
Born: October 20, 1787.
Baptised: December 1, 1787.
Married (1): June 29, 1809 to Hannah Bickerton (who died 1818). Hannah was the daughter of, of Thomas Bickerton and Mary Hilditch of Woodcott.
Married (2): May 11, 1819 at Worcester to Anna Hawley
Married (3): Anne Lillie (nee Gouldsmith) Died: at Leamington, c. ?

Children of John Evans and Hannah Bickerton (wife 1):-

1. Thomas Bickerton Evans of Greenside House, Wavertree, Liverpool, born May 29, 1810.
2. John Hilditch Evans, born November 1, 1814.
3. Edward Evans, born June 15, 1816 at Worcester.
4. Mary Hannah Evans, died 1823 in infancy.
5. Eliza Sugden Evans, married to George James Grant.

Children of John Evans and Anna Hawley (wife 2):-

1. Richard Hawley Evans, born February 29, 1820.
2. Henry Maddock Evans, died September 21, 1823 in infancy.
3. Worthington Evans, born August 28, 1827.
4. Henry Sugden Evans, born May 19, 1830.
5. Anna Evans, married November 27, 1844 to Edward Webb, died November 1, 1850 at Versailles.

Children of John Evans and Anne Lillie (wife 3)

1. Anna Lillie Evans, died 1885, married Frederick Thornas of Leamington.

John Evans died at Leamington c. ?

2. Edward Evans (Son of, Thomas Evans and Grace Sugden).
Born: July 10, 1789 at Welshpool.
Married: September 4, 1811 to Catherine Bickerton (died 1877).
Died: March 3, 1871.

NOTE: This Edward Evans was Mayor of Worcester 1841-42, and was also a J.P.

Hill & Evans
Cowell, Crane & Kilpin was established as British Wine manufacturers on Foregate Street, Worcester in the 1760s.
*William Hill (1788 – 1859), a Wesleyan Methodist from Stourport, and Edward Evans (1788 – 1871), a Welsh chemist, acquired the business from Charles Kilpin (1770 – 1845) in 1829.
Hill and Evans branched out into the production of vinegar from 1830. Vinegar was an important commodity, used as a preservative in an era before refrigeration. The vinegar-making process also utilised the waste from British Wine production. A vinegar brewery was established at Lowesmoor, Worcester. Hill and Evans devoted themselves to producing the purest malt vinegar, and utilised the most efficient and up-to-date production methods.
By 1844 Hill Evans was the sixth-largest brewer of vinegar in Britain, and the largest producer outside of London. 153,875 gallons of vinegar were produced in 1848.

Children of Edward Evans and Catherine Bickerton:

1. Edward Bickerton Evans, of Whitbourne Hall, Worcester, co. Hereford, born October 18, 1819.
2. Catherine Bickerton Evans, died June 10, 1855 unmarried
3. Mary Hilditch Evans, married Thomas Rowley Hill.
4. Eliza Bickerton Evans, living 1886.
5. Hannah Myra Evans, died March 14, 1821 in infancy.
6. Sarah Sugden Evans, married David Everett of Worcester.
7. Hannah Myra Evans, married Pearce Baldwin of Stourport.

Generation #5

Mary Hilditch Evans (daughter of Edward Evans and Catherine Bickerton)
Born: ?
Married: Thomas Rowley Hill (son of *William Hill 1788 - 1859 and Elizabeth Rowley 1781 - 1868).
Died: ?

Children of Mary Hilditch Evans and Thomas Rowley Hill, of Stourport, Worcester.

1. Thomas William Hill, of Froxmere Court, born 1843.
2. Alfred Edward Hill, died August 26, 1847.
3. Edward Henry Hill, born February 10, 1849. [in St. Martin's, Worcester,and baptised, at the Congregation Hall].
4. Mary Evans Hill, married Rev. Nathaniel Kane. View Marriage report in local paper
5. Catherine Eliza Hill, married Rev. Joseph Bowstead Wilson.View Marriage report in local paper

NOTE: Thomas Rowley Hill was M.P. for City of Worcester 1874-85, J.P. and D.L. co. Worcester, J.P. co. Hereford, High Sheriff co. Worcester 1870, Alderman City of Worcester, Mayor of Worcester.

Funeral of Mrs. Thomas Rowley Hill - Worcestershire Chronicle Saturday, 2nd January, 1892.


Worcestershire Chronicle - Saturday, 2nd January, 1892.

DEATH OF MRS. T. ROWLEY HILL.

A deep feeling of sorrow has found expression in Worcester, consequent upon the sad news, which spread very rapidly on Saturday, of the death of the wife of a gentleman who has for many years held a leading place in the affections of all classes in the city namely, Mr Alderman T. Rowley Hill. Mrs. Hill who was somewhat advanced in years, was only ill for a few days. She took a drive on Saturday week and caught a cold, which developed so rapidly that, on Christmas Day, Dr. Crowe, her medical attendant, could give no re-assuring words for her sorrowing husband and family, and between four and five o'clock on Saturday morning a very sweet life - as the Rev. Septimus March said at Angel street Chapel on Sunday morning - was closed. Mr March on behalf of the congregation, prayed that Mr. Hill, in his unspeakable bereavement, might not only remember thankfully the Lord's goodness in the past, but think very hopefully of the fuller joy in the future. They also remembered the sons - Mr Thomas William Hill and Mr. Edward Henry Hill - who had lost their tender mother; and the daughters - Mrs. R. N. Kane and Mrs. J. B. Wilson - whose loss was also very great.
The deceased lady, Mrs. Mary Hilditch Hill, was the second daughter of the late Ald. Edward Evans, of Whitbourne Hall; one of her sisters was married to the late Mr David Everitt, surgeon, of this city, and another to the late Mr. Baldwin, of Stourport. She was the second wife of Mr. Rowley Hill, who had first married a daughter of the late Mr. Ald. Richard Evans of Britannia Square. Mr. Richard Evans and Mr. Edward Evans, though great friends, were no relation to each other; both were Aldermen of the city, Justices of the Peace, Charity Trustees, &c., and both filled the office of Mayor of the City.
Animated by a singularly sympathetic nature, the union of the Kindly Christian lady who has just passed away, with a gentleman no less warm-hearted, enabled her to exercise to the full the charitable spirit that characterised her. It was indeed difficult, if not impossible, to trace the streams by which this truly noble lady accomplished her mission. Mrs. Hill was one of the silent workers by whom the great bulk of good is performed, and shielded herself as much as possible from publicity. Recognising the ill results of indiscriminate giving, she directed her charity into proper channels that nothing but good could come of it; and it is perfectly correct to say that every deserving object which was brought unto her notice received substantial help. Mrs. Hill's calm, beautiful disposition, combined with her free, bountiful hand, won for her a chief place in the affections of all who were so fortunate as to be acquainted with her. All will feel her loss, but none more keenly than the poor.
To the congregationalist body, and especially Angel street congregation and schools, the London Missionary Society, and the Worcester Orphan Asylum, her sympathy was especially shown; but her generosity recognised neither sect nor creed, and her benefactions were boundless. In her early days Mrs Hill was one of the most indefatigable teachers in the Sunday school at Angel street, during the pastorate of the late Rev. Dr. Redford, when Mr. Rowley Hill was also a teacher. The deceased leaves two sons and two daughters to mourn her loss - Mr. Thomas William Hill, of Froxmere Court; Mrs. Kane, wife of the Rev. R. N. Kane, of Suckley Rectory, and Mrs. Wilson, wife of the Rev. J. B. Wilson, of Knightwick Rectory.

THE FUNERAL

Amidst general evidences of respect, and sincere sympathy with her bereaved husband, the remains of Mrs. T. Rowley Hill were laid to rest on Wednesday in the Cemetery in the Astwood road. The funeral procession left St Catherine's Hill, London road, shortly before twelve o'clock, and proceeded by the Midland road to the Cemetery, which was reached about half-an-hour later. The hearse was followed by five carriages containing the following mourners an others.
FIRST CARRIAGE - Ald. T. Rowley Hill (husband0, Messrs. T. H. And E. H. Hill (sons).
SECOND CARRIAGE - Mr. E. Bickerton Evans (brother) and Mrs Evans.
THIRD CARRIAGE - The Rev. J. B. Wilson and the Rev. R. N. Kane (son-in-laws) and Mrs. J. Kane.
FOURTH CARRIAGE - The servants at St. Catherine's Hill.
FIFTH CARRIAGE - DR. Crowe and Rev. S. March, B. A.
Inspire of the pitifully wet weather a large number of citizens assembled at the Cemetery to offer a last tribute of respect to the memory of the deceased lady.
Those present included the Mayor (Mr. Walter Holland), Messrs. James Hancock, W. Joseland, W. Temple Bourne, Walter Price, Harry Day, T. Boyce, W. E. Tucker (Deacons of Angel street Chapel), Mr T. Southall, Mrs. Temple Bourne, Mr. E. P Evans, Mr. J. S. Wood, the Rev. James Lewitt, the Rev. E. J. Boon, Mr. W. H. Hughes, Mrs. March, Mrs. Furnell, Miss Coleman, Mr. Marsh, Mr. And Mrs. Jarman, Mr. J. V. Stallard, Mr. James (Kempsey), Mr. U. R. Cosford, Mr C. Townshend, and Mr. P. Townshend, Mr. T. C. Richens, Master of the Orphan Asylum, attended with eight of the elder boys and a similar number of the elder girls of that Institution, to which Mrs. Rowley Hill was a great benefactress.
The coffin was conveyed by several bearers, some from Messrs. Hill and Evans's Works, into the chapel. It was oak and brass furniture, and upon the lid was a brief inscription giving the name and age of the deceased lady. It was covered with a very large number of the most beautiful wreaths. A large circlet enclosing a cross was laid upon the coffin by Alderman Hill, and other wreaths were sent by Sir Edmund and Lady Lechmere "In memory of many years' friendship," Mrs. T. W. Hill; by sister Eliza, 'With much love"; the Rev. J. B. And Mrs. Wilson, the Rev. R. N. And Mrs. Kane, the Misses Kane; " Harry and Agnes, in loving memory"; Mrs. And Edward and Dora Everitt, Mr. And Mrs. S. H. Tombs, Mr. And Mrs. Tombs and Miss Durnford, Mr. And Mrs. Aston Webb, Mr. And Mrs. Thomas Southall, Mr. And Mrs. Samuel Southall, Mr. And Mrs. Augustus Schmidt, Mr. And Mrs. W. Hill Budgett, Mr. And Mrs. J. S. Wood, Mr. And Mrs. William Dovey, the Rev. R. Vaughn Price; "In loving memory from the household at The Uplands;" Mr. And Mrs. Temple Bourne, Mrs. J. H. Waters, Arthur W. Waters, and Celia Waters; Mrs. Townsend; "In affectionate sympathy from the Minister and Deacons of Angel street Chapel;" "A tribute of loving sympathy;" from the organist and choir of Angel. Street Church; others from Angel street Young Men's Class; "With Mary and fanny's deep sympathy;" Mr. George Crockett; "In memory of a dear and kind mistress from the servants at St. Catherine's Hill," and "In loving and grateful memory of Mrs. Thomas Rowley Hill, whose death was sincerely regretted by the officers and children of the Orphan Asylum."
The service, both in the chapel and at the grave side was read by the Rev. S. March. During the ceremony Ald. Hill displayed great emotion, and was supported from the grave side by his two sons.
During the service in the Chapel Mr. March briefly referred to the life of the late Mrs. Hill He said that it was inevitable that the degrees of their sorrow should be various. They must sorrow, and they were not forbidden to do so. But whilst they sorrowed they should not forget the gratitude and thankfulness due for such a life having been given to them - alleviating the sorrows of the sorrowful, increasing the joys of those who rejoiced, doing good unostentatiously. They must thank God for that life of consistency, for the influence it wielded, and continued and would continue to wield. They must not sorrow as those without faith and hope. It was a parting here, but a glad welcome in a Saviour's presence, and so they were full of thankfulness and fresh hope that that life had passed away like a sweet strain of music, which, however, still continued, though they would not here it - like a light that had gone from them, not extinguished, but burning more brightly in the pure atmosphere of Heaven. It appeared to him that there was one lesson that they should carry away with them, and that was, that if they would die a Christian death they should lead a Christian life. Then when the end came there would be no need of a final exhortation, no need of special absolution, no need of ceremonial consolation. It would be simply Christ fulfilling His word, "If I go to prepare a place for you, I will come again and receive you unto Myself; that where I am there may ye be also."
The coffin was lowered into the family vault close to the Chapel entrance. The vault already contains the remains of the late Mr. And Mrs. Evans, and of a son of the late Dr. Everitt, a nephew of Mrs. Rowley Hill.
Several old ladies from Mrs. Rowley Hill's cottages in the Cherry Orchard were also present at the funeral, and threw upon the coffin small bunches of flowers, touching tokens of gratitude for the kindness rendered at the hands of the benefactress.
Messr. J. Gaunt and Sons superintended the funeral.

 

The ringers at Suckley Church rang a muffled peal, on Wednesday evening, as a mark of respect for the memory of the late Mrs. Rowley Hill.
At the close of the morning service at Angel street Chapel on Sunday, the organist played the "Dead March," the whole of the congregation meanwhile standing; and in the evening Gaul's anthem, 'No shadows yonder," was effectively rendered.
The Rev. S. Naish, at the Wesleyan Chapel, Pump street, on Sunday evening, made sympathetic reference to recent deaths in the congregation, and also to the loss the city had sustained by the death of Mrs. Rowley Hill, and at the close of the service the "Dead March" was played on the organ by Mr. Sanday.
At the Salvationist's dinner to the poor people, on Boxing Day , Mr. Cosford alluded to the sad death of Mrs. Rowley Hill, and to her noble generosity in contributing to the dinner fund. Staff-Captain Groom suggested that they send a telegram of condolence from the assembly to Mr. Hill and the large audience at once rose to their feet to show their approval of the suggestion.
At a meeting of members of the New street Liberal Club, on Saturday last, Mr F. Corbett alluded in feeling terms to the sad event which had occurred that morning, and upon the proposition of the Chairman (Councillor Joseph Sigley) the following was unanimously agreed to, and the hon. Secretary directed to forward a copy of it to Mr. Hill;
To Thos. Rowley Hill Esq. " Dear Sir, - The members of New street Liberal Club, having heard, with great regret, of the death of your beloved wife, beg to convey to you their deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement."


 

 

Death of Thomas Rowley Hill Worcester Journal - 10th October, 1896.


Deaths
Hill - October 9, at St. Catherine's Hill, Worcester. Thomas Rowley Hill, Esq., of Worcester and Suckley, aged 80.

Worcester Journal - 10th October, 1896. Read an account by Rev. William Urwick M. A. - from his book Nonconformity in Worcester

We regret to record the death, at an early hour this morning, at St. Catherine's Hill, London road, of Mr. Thomas Rowley Hill, formerly M.P. for the city. It is now nearly five weeks since Mr. Hill was taken ill with an internal complaint from which he had previously suffered, He was attended by Dr. Crowe and Mr. Bates, and operations were performed. For a time Mr. Hill seemed to rally a little, but all along his condition has been serious.
By the death of Mr. Thomas Rowley Hill Worcester loses one who has been prominent in the public life of the city and county for nearly half a century, whose life will stand as an example of good citizenship,one who in all his works looked only to the public will, who had no selfish aim, and holding high and honourable offices and positions, and earning gratitude from and distinction among his fellow citizens, was ever modest and without self-consciousness. Though his ability and his wealth and his high sense of duty forced prominence in public life upon him, he was always of a retiring disposition, and whether he did good by stealth" or openly as an example and encouraged the others, he blushed to find it fame. The principle of his life, which was apparent in his actions, is well described by some words of advice to younger men he spoke some years ago:- "Use the faculties God has given you in the best way you can. Don't be afraid of hard work; but be afraid of cultivating self-indulgences, and above all seek God's blessing upon what you do, and you will attain as much success in life as is good for you."
Mr. Hill came of an old Worcestershire family, who were at different times connected with Stourport and Little Witley. He was the son of Mr William Hill, F.R.A.S., was born at Stourport in 1816, and was therefore in his 81st year. He completed his education at that famous academic institution , then known as the London University College, and afterwards devoted his energies to carrying on the Worcester Vinegar Works, which largely by his business sagacity, developed into the largest of the kind in the world. He and the late Mr Everett, surgeon, of Worcester, married two sisters, Worcester ladies; and his second wife, who died in 1891, was the sister of Mr. E. Bickerton Evans, his partner in business. Mrs. Hill took an unostentatious interest in many charitable movements, and was one of those ladies who were instrumental in establishing the Crèche.
In his early years Mr. Hill took and interest in meteorology, and mad a painstaking record of the weather and rainfall. The firm of Hill, Evans and Co. had the reputation of being model employers, and the retirement a few years ago of Mr. Hill and Mr. Evans, from the active management of the works, was signalised by an act of great munificence on their part and also by a pleasant manifestation of the respect in which they were held by their employees. A cheque for £1,173 was ordered to be divide amongst the employees, regardless of the position held, but with regard to the length of service. There were 118 men in all, and some received as much as £20, whilst one (the foreman of the wine vaults) received the sum of £42. In return for the kindness the men presented the two partners with silver inkstands, and passed a resolution expressing deep regret at the severance of the link of goodwill which had existed between the employers and employed.
Mr. Hill will always be remembered as one who realised most entirely the duties of citizenship. Having won wealth in business he devoted himself and his purse to the service of his fellow citizens. He filled all sorts of public positions and look part in all public movements. He was first as elected member and then as Alderman a most useful member of the City Council for 40 years, being first elected in November, 1856. He served as Sheriff of the City in 1857-58, and as mayor in 1858-9. In 1858 he was elected as Alderman. It was not until November of last year that Mr. Hill, because of failing health, left the Council. His resignation of the office of Alderman was source of the greatest regret to every member of the Council, and he received an unanimous requisition to reconsider his decision; but declined, because, so conscientious was he in all his work, he felt that failing health would prevent his fulfilling the duty of an Alderman, and unless he could do that he would not accept the honour of the position.
His association with municipal life, however, was maintained by his regular attendance at and useful part in the proceedings of the Library Committee. While in the Corporation Mr. Hill always took the deepest interest in whatever affected the health of the people, and as an instance of his conscientiousness in civic affairs we may recall that he stood alone, among those of his political party in the Council, in urging that a better water supply should be secured by improving the sand filtration at the waterworks rather than by going to the great expense of obtaining an uncertain supply from the Lickey. Another instance of his interest in municipal matters was his practical help with regard to the conversion of corporation loans into corporation stock. In February and March, 1888, he took £10,000 corporation debentures at 31/2 per cent, and the City Council were thereby enabled to pay off mortgages bearing interest at 4 per cent. He was an earnest advocate of the adoption by the Council of electric lighting, as an indeed of all public improvements.
Mr. Hill's first parliamentary contest was in 1868, when his address contained characteristic reference to a subject in which he always took the greatest interest, that of education. In his election address in that year he said, with regard to education, "I would gladly support measures that would tend to promote the social instruction of the people, but should prefer aiding them in this work rather than interfering with their feelings of independence by compulsory measures." At the election in that year Mr. Hill was one of three Liberals and the result was that Messrs. William Laslett and A. C. Sheriff were elected and Sir Francis Lycett and Mr. T. R. Hill were defeated. At the next election Mr. Hill was elected as one of the representatives of the city with Mr. Sheriff, the defeated candidates being Messrs. Allcroft and W. Laslett. In 1880 Mr. Hill was again elected with Mr. McIntyre, and continued to represent the city until 1885, the, by the Redistribution of Seta Bill, the city had to elect one member only, and there was a keen fight between him and the Hon. George Allsopp, and the latter was elected, as again in the following year, by a narrow majority. It is safe to say that there was, in the opposition to Mr. Hill's election, no personal feeling, no thought that he was not eminently worthy of so high a position, or that in the past he had not done all he could or should for the city of which he was one of the most eminent citizens. It was upon a great political principle that Mr. Hill was defeated, and everyone regretted that a great imperial issue came between them and one who had in the past had rendered them to faithful services. In 1837 Mr. Hill announced his intentions to withdraw from the Liberal candidature, and at the next election, though strongly pressed by the Liberal party, he declined to come forward. In politics Mr. Hill was firm Gladstonian , and a fair and courteous opponent in party strife, in which he took an active part up to the last few years. For some time past, however, he had not been seen on the platform party meetings, noting upon the advice of his doctor not to attend evening meetings; but at such meetings there was always received from him vigorous and encouraging letter.
Mr. Hill was for many years a magistrate of the city and the county of Worcester, and of the county of Hereford. He was also a Deputy Lieutenant of Worcestershire. As a county magistrate he was until his recent illness regularly at the right hand of the. Chairman of Petty Sessions in the Worcester Division, and sometimes presided over a second court. Mr. Hill was High Sheriff of the County in 1876. Mr. Hill was an elected member of the first Worcestershire County Council. He yielded to the pressure of all classes as a large landowner in Suckley, distinguished for his great interest in the welfare of his tenants and labourers, to stand for the Martley division; and he was elected in in opposition to Mr. James Essex, who afterwards became a county Alderman. Mr. Hill was re-elected unopposed in 1892 and again in 1895. He regularly attended the meetings of Council and committees. He was a member of the Standing Joint Committee and of the Technical Instruction Committee.
One of the public works in which Mr. Hill took a great interest, and which he actively promoted, was the Severn navigation Scheme. He was a member of the Severn Commission, and favoured the improvements of the navigation from the beginning. He subscribed largely to the capital required, and supported the scheme in the City Council. He went to London in this connection, as one of the deputation to urge the Great Western Railway Company to construct a line from the docks at Diglis to carry traffic on to the main line.
Amongst his many other interests, Mr. Hill was always deeply interested in educational matters, and was one of those Nonconformists who supported the voluntary system. He was chairman of the Worcester School Board, and a member of the Suckley District School Board, and chairman of the Governing Body of the Boys' and Girls' British Schools at St Martin's gate. In the original building of these schools he had a part, and for the building of the girls' school in connection therewith, in 1893, he gave the site, valued at £700, and towards the building fund £1,000, He was one of the most prominent promoters of the Library movement in Worcester, and later of the Victoria Institute scheme, the successful completion of which owes much to his generosity and influence. He was once secretary to the Old City Library, which formed the nucleus of the Public Library, and subscribed £500 towards the cost of establishing the Free Public Library on the adoption of the Public Libraries Act. He was one of the first subscribers, of £1,000, to the Victoria Institute scheme, and since contributed an additional £500, the last subscription being in response to a special appeal in 1894, when the foundation-scheme of the Institute was laid. As the Vice-Chairman of the Library Committee he had up to a week or two ago taken a p personal and active interest in all the details relating to the progress of the Institute, and was in fact the mover of the resolution requesting the Mayoress of the city to perform the opening ceremony. Some time ago the desire was unanimously expressed by the members of the Library Committee to permanently associate Mr. Hill's name with the Institute by naming one of the museum galleries the "Thomas Rowley Hill Gallery." With distinguishing modesty, however, he declined the honour.

Today you can vist Worcester Museum where there is indeed a "Thomas Rowley Hill Gallery." and this bust which you can see there is of his father-in-law Edward Evans (1789-1871) by William Brodie (Evans along with Willliam Hill, [Thomas's father] founded the vinegar makers Hill & Evans in 1830. By 1903 they had the largest vinegar works in the world, in Lowesmore. Evans was also Managing Director of the Worcester City & County Banking Company) The sculpture was lent by the bank [by then part of Lloyds] to the 1882 Worcestershire Exhibition, before entering the museum collectiom.

It was a recognition of his devotion to the promotion of education that he was elected in November, 1887, one of the Six Masters, the governing body of the Royal Free Grammar School, and it is worth noticing that he was the first Nonconformist elected on that body. By this his interest in education was extended from the voluntary system, shown by his part in the maintenance of the British Schools, and the School Board, of which he was chairman up to 1886, to the old endowed schools of the city, with the interests of which he further identified himself by a noble subscription of £1,000 towards augmenting the endowment of the Cathedral School.
Mr. Hill's disinterested and splendid service to the city in a variety of capacities was recognised by a public testimonial in 1881. The testimonial took the form of a portrait, and there were 969 subscribers. The portrait which represents Mr. Hill in the House of Commons, was painted by Mr. Frank Holl, and was hung in the Guildhall at a large public gathering on September 27, 1881. It bears the inscription: "This portrait of Alderman Thomas Rowley Hill, M.P., was painted by means of subscriptions given by his friends and fellow citizens, and was placed in the Assembly-room, Guildhall, in recognition of his private worth and distinguished public services to the citizens of Worcester during his long life among them, of the thorough identification of himself with the interests of the city and county of Worcester, and of the affectionate esteem felt for him by all classes. - September 27, 1881."


[Photo Credit: Worcester Guildhall]
Alderman T. Rowley Hill (1816-1896), MP
Painted by Frank Holl (1845-1888)

Mr. Hill was looked to with the very highest respect and gratitude by the Nonconformist bodies in the city, nearly if not quite all of whom owed something to his munificence at some time or an other. He was President of the Worcester Free Churches Association, and as the leading, Nonconformist presented, on behalf of the Nonconformist bodies in the city, an address of welcome to the present Bishop of the Diocese. He regularly worshipped and sometimes read the Scriptures at Angel-street Chapel, to which he was always a munificent friend. He contributed largely to the restoration of the chapel; and on May 1, 1888, he laid the memorial stone of the handsome new Sunday schools adjoining the Chapel, recalling on that occasion, how in early life he was a Sunday School teacher, when the school was held in the gallery of the Chapel. The buildings then begun could hardly have been undertaken but for his munificence. The site adjoining the Chapel he gave for the purpose, purchasing it for £2600, and in addition he gave £1,000 towards the £4,400 required for the building, which was supplemented by gifts during the progress of work. He also erected the house at Battenhall for the minister of the Congregational Church, He was a munificent donor to the funds of the London Missionary Society, giving in 1895 one sum of £1,000, and to other funds organised by the Congregational connexion, amongst whom he was very prominent, and for whom in a representative capacity he signed various memorials and on many occasions exercised his personal influence.
He was in religion broad-minded, and his liberality extended far beyond the bounds of the connection of which he was a member Towards the restoration of Suckley Church he gave £1,300; and £100 towards the erection of the new Railway Mission Hall in East-street, which was recently opened; and in the foundation stone-laying proceedings of which he took part, It were impossible even to mention
all the public charities and charitable societies to which Mr. Hill was regular subscriber. In fact he helped practically everything of a useful character in the city. The Royal Albert Orphan Asylum was one of the charitable institutions in which he took an especial interest, and he subscribed largely to its funds, besides sending frequent presents in kind for the good cheer of the inmates at festive seasons, and giving to it the help of his influence and regular attention as a member of the committee and a trustee. Another institution in which he took a prominent and personal interest was the Young Men's Christmas Association, of which he was President. He was a Vice-President of the national Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and a member of the committee of the Discharged Prisoners' Aid Society. Mr. Hill was President of the Midland Counties Sunday school conference held in Worcester in 1881, Mr. Hill was a Vice-President of the Worcester General Infirmary, amongst whose life-governors he was numbered by reason of his donation of £100 to the funds, and he was at one time a member of the Executive Committee, also being a very useful member from 1888-1890. He showed his approval of the efforts made recently to raise a special fund for providing a nurses' home in connection with that institution by a generous donation of £50.
Though a Nonconformist he often gave sympathy and help to Church movements. The following in one of many instances:- Up to 1883 the living of St Andrew's in this city, was about £75 a year towards altering which good Churchmen in the parish had repeatedly tried and failed. The matter was brought to the notice of Mr. Rowley Hill, who excessed himself energetically to bring influence to bear upon the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and an accumulated fund of some £3,700 (which had been left by a wealthy Worcester lady for the purpose of supplementing the incomes of poor clergymen in the city) was brought to light, and assigned to the St. Andrew's parish, thereby raising the stipend of the Rector to something like £240 a year.
Very little known to the public is one good instance of Mr. Hill's munificence. Twenty years ago or more he established some almshouses in the Bath-road. The houses of which there were four, are of good size, and were built especially for the purpose. They are for aged women, and each of the occupants receives seven or eight shillings a week.
Mr. Hill leaves two sons - Mr. Thomas W. Hill, of Froxmere Court, Crowle, and Mr. E. Henry Hill, of Broadwas Court - and two daughters. It is noteworthy that two of Mr Hill's daughters married clergymen - the Rev J. B. Wilson and the Rev. R. N. Kane. Mr Hill has property in the neighbourhood of their cures, Knightwick, Alfrick and Suckley, and has been particularly generous to church work under their directions.
The great bell of the Cathedral was tolled this morning.

REFERENCES AT THE CITY POLICE COURT.

At the City Police Court, this morning, before a full Bench of Magistrates, allusion was made to the death of Mr. Rowley Hill.

The Mayor said that they would not like to let that occasion go by without referring to the death of Mr. Rowley Hill. It was a cause of deep regret to the magistrates of the city of Worcester and to the citizens. There was no one more respected for his public services, for his munificences and high character, In these early moments it would be impossible to fully estimate the loss they felt, but they might at least express their sympathy and sorrow at his loss, and pass a resolution expressing their sense of the deep bereavement the city had sustained in the loss of one of the best men he (his Lordship) had met. Mr. Hill had served the city in many ways and many offices, and there were no office which he had adorned to which he did not devote his fullest powers. He had conferred on the city many benefits which will long be remembered. He moved the following resolution:- :That the justices of the city of Worcester desire to place on record an expression of their sense of the deep loss sustained by the city on the death of Mr. Rowley Hill, the senior magistrate on this Bench, and to offer to his family an assurance of the sympathy in the great loss they, in common with all the inhabitants of Worcester, have sustained." Ald. Herbert Caldicott said it was with very great respect that he seconded the resolution. He had hoped that Mr. Hill's life would have been spared. It was considered by the citizens of Worcester that they had lost a grand old man, ever foremost in any good work, and his charity knew no bounds. There were very few people who appealed to him on behalf of themselves, charity, education, or any other good work without receiving a kind response. The only thing they could do was to offer their respectful sympathy with Mr. Hill's family, and trust that those who were left would endeavour to perpetuate his great and good work. Mr. W. W. A. Tree, speaking on behalf of the solicitors practising in the Court, said they heartily agreed with he observations which had been well made by the Mayor and Ald. Caldicott. Mr. Hill had not been a very regular attendant at that Bench, but on the County Bench he had held a conspicuous position, and there was no magistrate who discharged his duties with more regularity. On behalf of the citizens Mr. Tree said he felt that he could only very feebly express the sad grief which they felt when they heard of Mr. Hill's death. Mr. Hill had occupied a position amongst his fellow citizens which was altogether unique and exceptional, and he was not exaggerating when he said no one's death would be more severely felt in the city.
The funeral will take place at the Cemetery on Monday, at 12.30.


 

The will of the late Mr. Thomas Rowley Hill - from newspapers at that time in 1897

 

The Morning Post - Wednesday, 13th January, 1897.

Estate duty has been paid on £170,322 4s 9d. as the value of the personal estate of Mr. Thomas Rowley Hill. of St. Catherine's Hall, Worcester, an Alderman of the City of Worcester, who died on the 9th of October last, aged 80 years. Probate of Mr. Hill's will has been granted to the surviving executors, his sons Mr. Thomas William Hill, of Foxmere Court, Worcester, and Mr. Edward Henry Hill, of Broadwas Court, Worcester. By his will, which bears date August 21, 1888 Mr. Hill bequeathed to his wife, Mrs. Mary Hilditch Hill (daughter of Mr. Edward Evans,of Worcester), £1,000 and his household effects, and he devised to her the

St. Catherine's Hall estate, or if she should elect not to accept that devise he bequeathed to her instead £25,000. Mr. Hill left the residue of his property in trust for Mrs. Hill during her life, and subject to her life interest for his children, but by a codicil made on August 4, 1892, after the death of Mrs. Hill the testator bequeathed to his sons-in-law the Rev. Richard Kane and the Rev. Joseph Wilson £1,000 each, and to his daughters-in-law Mrs. Bertha Hill and Mrs. Agnes Elizabeth Hill £1,000 each, and to his grand- children each £1,000. He bequeathed his household effects for distribution amongst his four children, and he gave his son Mr. E. W. Hill the option of purchase of the St. Catherine's Hall estate for £25,00, and to him and to his son Mr. Edward Henry Hill successively the option of purchase of the remainder of his real estate for £60,000. Subject thereto, the testator left all his real and personal estate in trust for his said two sons and his daughters, Mrs. Mary Evans Kane and Mrs. Catherine Eliza Wilson.

 

London News - 23rd January, 1897.

The will (dated Aug. 21, 1888), with a codicil (dated Aug. 4, 1892) 0f Mr. Thomas Rowley Hill, of St. Catherine's Hall, Worcester, M.P. for Worcester 1874-85, Who died on Oct. 9, was proved at the Worcester District Registry on Dec. 30, by Thomas William Hill and Edward Henry Hill, the sons and surviving executors, the value of the personal estate being £170,322. The testator gives £1000 each to his sons-in-law the Rev. Richard Nathaniel Kane and the Rev. Joseph Bowstead Wilson, his daughters-In-law Mrs Bertha Hill and Mrs Agnes Elizabeth Hill, and to each of his grandchildren; and his silver plate and jewels between his four children. His son Thomas William Hill is to have the option, and failing him his son Edward Henry Hill and his two daughters successively, of Purchasing the St, Catherine's Hall Estate for £25,000, and other real estate in Warwickshire and Hereford for
£60,000. The residue of his property he leaves between his four children, Thomas William Hill, Edward Henry Hill, Mrs. Mary Evans Kane, and Mrs. Catherine Eliza Wilson, in equal shares, as tenants in common.


 


Edward Henry Hill - Information regarding his life and the lives of his siblings and their parents.


Edward Henry Hill (Head)
1849-Deceased • KCMD-S6Q​
Birth 10 February 1849 Worcester, Worcestershire, England
Christening 26 August 1849 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Death: 19th April, 1911, Broadwas, Worcestershire.
Residence 1851 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1861 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1871 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1881 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England
Occupation from 1871 to 1891
Occupation from 1881 to 1891
Residence 1891 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England
Residence 31 March 1901 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England

Elizabeth Agnes Bailey (Wife)
1850-1893 • LH3M-53Z
Birth 11 October 1850 Kingston, Jamaica
Christening 31 December 1850 Kingston, Jamaica
Death 19 January 1893 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Burial 21 January 1893 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1861 Hampshire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1871 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1881 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England
Residence 1891 Broadwas, Worcestershire, England
Other (Obituary) 21 January 1893 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Marriage 1 June 1870 Worcester, Worcestershire, England

Edward Henry Hill's
SIBLINGS


Thomas Hill (Brother)
1843-Deceased • LH3M-YF5​
Birth 23 June 1843 Hill and Moor, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Christening 31 March 1844 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1851 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom

Francis W Hill (Brother)
1844-Deceased • L12Y-X3Y​
Birth 1844 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1861 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom

Mary Evans Hill (Sister)
1845-Deceased • K6QW-1P6​
Birth about 1845 Hill and Moor, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1851 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1861 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1871 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 31 March 1901 Suckley, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1911 Suckley, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom

Alfred Edward Hill (Brother)
1847-1847 • MGC1-KZV​
Birth 13 May 1847
Hill and Moor, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Death 26 August 1847

Catherine Eliza Hill (Sister)
1851-Deceased • KCLV-CH6​
Birth about 1851
Hill and Moor, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Christening 22 December 1852
Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom Residence 1861
Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom Residence 1871
Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom Residence 1881
Worcester St Martin, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom

Their - PARENTS

Thomas Rowley Hill (Father)
1816-1896 • LH3M-B3T​
Birth 1 March 1816 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Christening 30 May 1816 Stourport, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Death 12 October 1896 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Burial 1896 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1851 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1861 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1871 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1881 Worcester St Martin, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1891 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Other (Obituary)
10 October 1896 Sheffield, Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom
Other (Obituary)
10 October 1896 Manchester, Lancashire, England, United Kingdom

Married: 26 July 1842 Worcestershire

Mary Hilditch Evans (Mother)
1814-1891 • LH3M-BSS​
Birth 17 March 1814 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Christening 22 September 1841 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Death 26 December 1891 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1851 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1861 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1881 Worcester St Martin, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Residence 1891 Worcester, Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Other (Obituary)
2 January 1892 Worcestershire, England, United Kingdom
Other (Obituary)
2 January 1892 Leeds, Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom

Thomas Rowley Hill [Parents]

William Hill 1788 - 1859
Married: 3rd September 1810 Upper Mitton, Worcestershire
Elizabeth Rowley 1781 - 1868

Mary Hilditch Evans [Parents]

Edward Evans 1789 - 1871
Married: 4 September 1811
Catherine Bickerton 1789 - 1877

Elizabeth Agnes Bailey [Parents]

William Bailey 1825 1870
Married: c. 1845 England
Harriet xxx. 1825 - 1881


 


Generation #6

Catherine Eliza Hill (Daughter of, Mary Hilditch Evans and Thomas Rowley Hill).
Born: ?
Married: Rev. Joseph Bowstead Wilson.
Died: ?

Children of Catherine Eliza Hill and Rev. Joseph Bowstead Wilson:

1. Thomas Bowstead Wilson.
2. Humphrey Bowstead Wilson.
3. Mary Valence Wilson.


 

 

Edward Henry Hill - [1849 - 1911] - Census 1851, 1861 & 1871.


1851 Census

First Name, Relationship, Marital, Status, Sex, Age, Birth, Year, Birth Place, Occupation.

Thomas R. Hill - Head - Married - Male - age 35 - b. 1816, Worcestershire. [British Wine & A-O]
Mary H. Hill Wife - Married - Female - age 37 - b. 1814, Worcestershire.
Thomas W. Hill - Son - Single - Male - age 7 - b. 1844, Worcestershire. [Scholar]
Edward H. Hill - Son - Single - Male - age 2 - b. 1849, Worcestershire.
Mary E. Hill Daughter - Single - Female - age 0 - b. 1851 Worcestershire.

Eliza Daniell - Servant - Single - Female - age 24 - b. 1827, Ombersley, Worcestershire. [House Servant]
Emily Morgan - Servant - Single - Female - age 20 - b. 1831, Bransford, Worcestershire. [House Servant]
Anne Groncott - Servant - Single - Female - age 20 - b. 1831, Comford, Derbyshire. [House Servant]

Address: 4, London Road, Rose Hill, Saint Martin, Worcester.

1861 Census

Thomas R. Hill - Head - Married - Male - age 45- b. 1816, Worcestershire. [Alderman British Wines]
Mary H. Hill - Wife - Married - Female - age 41 - b. 1820, Worcestershire.
Francis W. Hill - Son - Single - Male - age 17 - b. 1844, Worcester. [Associate of Art]
Edward H. Hill - Son - Single - Male - age 12 - b. 1849, Worcester. [Scholar]
Mary E. Hill - Daughter - Single - Female - age10 - b. 1851, Worcester. [Scholar]
Catherine G. Hill - Daughter - Single - Female - age 8 - b. 1853, Worcester. [Scholar]

Eliza Lewis - Servant - Single - Female - age 20 - b. 1841, Dilwyn, Herefordshire. [Servant]
Martha Hunter - Servant - Single - Female - age 29 - b. 1832, Wem, Shropshire. [Servant]
Ann master - Servant - Widow - Female - age 52 - b. 1809, Corsham, Wiltshire. [Servant]
Mary Daggs - Servant - Single - Female - age 22 - b. 1839, Ludlow, Shropshire. [Pupil Teacher]

Address: London Road, Saint Martin, Worcester.

Marriage - 1st June, 1870 - Newspaper cutting.

On the 1st inst., at St. George's Church, Worcester, by the Rev. B. Davies, assisted by the Rev. R. F. Woodward, EDWARD HENRY, second son of THOMAS ROWLEY HILL, Esq., High Sheriff of Worcestershire, to ELIZABETH AGNES, second daughter of the late WILLIAM BAILEY, Esq., of Clevelands Bassett, near Southhampton.

1871 Census

Edward H. Hill - Head - Married - Male - age 22 - b. 1849, Worcester.
Elizabeth Agnes Hill - Wife - Married - Female - age 20 - b. 1851, Jamaica, West Indies.
Harris N. Pinnock - Visitor - Male - age 24 - b. 1847, Hampshire.
Emma Steed - Servant - Female - age 22 - b. 1849, Worcestershire.
Jane Hands - Servant - Female - age 19 - b. 1852, Worcestershire.

Address: London Road, St. Peter, Worcester.


 

 

Edward Henry Hill - [1849 - 1911] - Census 1881, 1891, 1901 & 1911.

 

1881 Census. [RG11/2910]

Broadwas Court.

Edward Henry Hill - Head, Married, [age 32] British Wine & Vinegar Manufacturer - b. Worcester.
Agnes Elizabeth Hill - Wife, Married, [age 30] - b. Jamaica.
Harriet Bailey - Mother-in-Law, Widow, [age 56] - b. Barnsgate, Kent.
Gertrude Bailey - Sister-in-Law, [age 24] - b. Jamaica.
Frances Elizabeth Furyman, Cousin, [age 44] Governess - b. Barnsgate, Kent.
Mary Amelia Baker - Niece, [age 12] Scholar - b. Worcester.
Sarah Williams - Servant, Widow [age 53] Cook, domestic - b. Winterbourne, Gloucestershire.
Susan Leary - Servant, [age 21] Housemaid, domestic - b. Collington, Herefordshire.

 

1891 Census. [RG12/2322]

Broadwas Court.

Edward Henry Hill - Head, Married, [age 42] Vinegar Manufacturer - b. Worcester.
Agnes Elizabeth Hill - Wife, Married, [age 40] - b. Jamaica.
Elizabeth Kendall - Servant, Single, [age 57] House Keeper domestic - b. •
Sarah Linton - Servant, Single, [age 35] Servant, domestic - b. Ombersley, Worcestershire.
Mary Ann Brown - Servant, Single, [age 22] Servant, domestic - b. Bromyard, Herefordshire.
Mary Ann Fruman - Servant, Single, [age 20] Servant, domestic - b. Ombersley, Worcestershire.

 

1901 Census. [RG13/2775]

Broadwas Court.

Edward H Hill - Head, Widower, [age 52] Spice Wine Vinegar Maker - b. Worcester [City].
Fanny E Warren - Servant, Widower, [age 46] Cook, domestic - b. Martley, Worcestershire.
Susanna Baylis - Servant, Single, [age 26] House Maid, domestic - b. Ullingswick, Herefordshire.
Lilian H Rowley - Servant, Single, [age 19] House Maid, domestic - b. Dodderhill, Worcestershire.
Edith A Bourne - Servant, Single, [age 20] Kitchen Maid, domestic - b. Martley, Worcestershire.
Bessie H Warren - Servant, Single, [age 18] Scullery Maid, domestic - b. Martley, Worcestershire.

Court Cottages.

Edwin Gittens - Head, Married, [age 43] Coachman, domestic - b. Martley, Worcestershire.
Margaret Gittens - Wife, Married, [age 40] - b. Doddenham, Worcestershire.
Edith Gittens - Daughter, Single [age 12] - b. Doddenham, Worcestershire.
Frances Gittens - Daughter, Single [age 7] - b. Doddenham, Worcestershire.
Agnes Gittens - Daughter, Single [age 3] - b. Doddenham, Worcestershire.
Thomas Nutt - Boarder, Single, [age 20] Groom, domestic - b. Cradley, Herefordshire.

1911 Census.

Broadwas Court.

Fanny Eliza Warren - Servant, Widow, [age 56] Cook- Housekeeper, domestic - b. Martley, Worcestershire.
Susanna Baylis - Servant, Single, [age 36] Parlour Maid, domestic - b. Ullingswick, Herefordshire.
Kate Frances Underhill - Servant, Single, [age 34] House Maid, domestic - b. St. Andrew's, Droitwich, Worcestershire.
Minnie Burgess - Servant, Single, [age 21] Kitchen Maid, domestic - b. Chirton, Wiltshire.
Kate Hunt - Servant, Single, [age 20] House Maid, domestic - b. Fladbury, Worcestershire.
Beatrice Annie Sheppard - Servant, Single, [age 17] Scullery Maid, domestic - b. Martley, Worcestershire.

Edward Henry Hill was not on this census, it was filled in by his Housekeeper, Fanny Eliza Warren.

The census was taken on the 2nd April, 1911 and Edward Henry Hill died shortly after this on the 19th April, 1911.
So he may have been else where at the time.

The United Kingdom Census taken on the 2nd April, 1911 was the 12th nationwide census conducted in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. The total population of the United Kingdom was approximately 45,221,000, with 36,070,000 recorded in England and Wales, 4,761,000 in Scotland, and 4,390,000 in Ireland.

The gravestone of Edward and Agnes Hill can be found in Broadwas Churchyard, left of the Porchway.

[Left hand side of cross)

IN AFFECTIONATE MEMORY OF
THE DEARLY BELOVED WIFE OF EDWARD HENRY HILL
WHO DIED AT BROADWAS COURT
JANUARY 19 1893. AGED 41.
THERE SHALL BE NO MORE DEATH, NEITHER SORROW, NOR CRYING,
NEITHER SHALL THERE BE ANY MORE PAIN. REVELATION 21:4.

[Right hand side of cross]

IN AFFECTIONATE MEMORY OF
EDWARD HENRY HILL
WHO DIED AT BROADWAS COURT
APRIL 19 1911. AGED 62.
WELL DONE GOOD AND FAITHFUL SERVANT. ST MATTHEW 25:23.

 

The will of the late Mr. Edward henry Hill - The Birmingham Daily Mail, Thursday, July 27, 1911.


WORCESTER GENTLEMAN’S WILL

HANDSOME BEQUESTS TO CHARITY.

Mr Edward Henry Hill, of Broadwas Court, Worcester, second son of the late Mr T. Rowley Hill, M.P., chairman of Hill, Evans, and Co., Limited, Worcester, whose death occurred on April 19th, left estate valued at £186,542. Probate of his will has been granted to Mr. Richard Willis Hill Kane, of York Street, London and the Rev. Thomas Bowstead Wilson, of Walworth, his nephew, and Mr. George Frederick Sparrow Brown, of Worcester. Testator gives the Parish Room and Working Men’s Club built by him at Suckley, and £4,000 for the upkeep thereof, to the trustees, for the purpose of its being carried on as a mission room and club; £5,000 to the Royal Albert Orphan Asylum, Worcester; £3,000 each to the Knightwick Consumption Sanatorium and the Worcester Ophthalmic Hospital. £88,000 to his nephew, the Rev. Thomas B. Wilson; £1,000 each to ten nephews and nieces, his property in and around Suckley to his nephew, Richard Willis Kane; £500 a year to his sister-in-law, Gertrude Bailey during spinsterhood; and £500 each to his housekeeper and coachman; £400 each to his gamekeeper and gardener; and the residue of his estate he leaves to his sisters, Mary Kane and Catherine Wilson.

The Birmingham Daily Mail, Thursday, July 27, 1911.


 


 

 

Edward Henry Hill - Worcester Vinegar Manufacturer. - He was a third generation of the business and you can see his name towards the end of this information.


HILL EVANS & CO OF WORCESTER

Hill Evans was the largest vinegar brewer in Britain for most of the Victorian era. It grew to become the largest vinegar brewery in the world.

Hill & Evans
Cowell, Crane & Kilpin was established as British Wine manufacturers on Foregate Street, Worcester in the 1760s.
William Hill (1788 – 1859), a Wesleyan Methodist from Stourport, and Edward Evans (1788 – 1871), a Welsh chemist, acquired the business from Charles Kilpin (1770 – 1845) in 1829.
Hill and Evans branched out into the production of vinegar from 1830. Vinegar was an important commodity, used as a preservative in an era before refrigeration. The vinegar-making process also utilised the waste from British Wine production.
A vinegar brewery was established at Lowesmoor, Worcester. Hill and Evans devoted themselves to producing the purest malt vinegar, and utilised the most efficient and up-to-date production methods.
By 1844 Hill Evans was the sixth-largest brewer of vinegar in Britain, and the largest producer outside of London. 153,875 gallons of vinegar were produced in 1848.

The sons enter the business
Thomas Rowley Hill (1816 – 1896) and Edward Bickerton Evans (1819 – 1893) had joined their fathers in partnership by 1848. It was the two sons, especially Rowley Hill, who provided the impetus and drive for the business to develop further scale. Rowley Hill had been barred from Oxbridge due to his Congregationalist faith, and instead received an education at University College, London.
Hill Evans produced 426,546 gallons of vinegar in 1852.

Dispute with The Lancet
The Lancet, a leading medical journal, commissioned a chemical analysis of leading vinegars in 1852, and asserted that Hill Evans used sulphuric acid, a widely exploited adjunct which reduced maturation times. Hill Evans & Co. refuted this, challenging the editor of the journal to conduct "the most rigid analysis of their vinegar, by chemists of acknowledged reputation".
Eminent scientists such as Dr. Lyon Playfair (1818 – 1898) were afforded free access to the entirety of the Hill Evans site, as well as their brewing records for the previous twenty years. The Lancet was subsequently forced to back down in a rare and humiliating defeat, and conceded that sulphate of lime, which occurred naturally in the local water, had been mistaken for sulphuric acid.

The sons become sole proprietors

Thomas Rowley Hill and Edward Bickerton Evans were the sole proprietors of the business by 1858. Rowley Hill was a generous benefactor, with a strong work ethic and high integrity. Bickerton Evans was a down-to-earth Baptist. Hill Evans established a reputation as a model employer.
1,048,229 gallons of vinegar were produced in 1858. The following year 1,208,600 gallons were produced, which positioned Hill Evans as the largest manufacturer of vinegar in Britain.
Lea & Perrins used Hill Evans vinegar to make their Worcestershire sauce from at least 1862.

The vinegar manufacturing process
In 1862 there were eight fermenting vessels for producing vinegar, each with a capacity of 16,000 gallons.
There were thirty vats, each with a capacity of 8,000 to 12,000 gallons, for the acidification of the brew. The brew would be held in these vats for around a month, with birch branches used to oxidise the liquid. When this process was complete, beechwood chips were used to fine, or clarify, the vinegar.
There were around twenty storage vats for the finished product, with five vats reckoned to have a capacity of 80,000 gallons each.
The finished product was actually of pale straw colour, so caramel (burnt sugar) was added as a final process to darken the product in accordance with customer preference in the English market.

Continued development
A new vat was introduced in 1863 with a capacity of 114,645 gallons. It was the largest vat in the world, and far larger than its closest rival, an 80,000 gallon vessel at the Guinness brewery in Dublin.

 
  Built in around 1870, the filling hall on Pheasant Street.


Built in around 1870, the filling hall on Pheasant Street contained the large vinegar vats used for storage.
Hill Evans had an annual output of two million gallons of vinegar by 1866, and was by far the largest vinegar producer in Britain. Around 100 people were employed.
Hill Evans had established a London office and warehouse on the site of the former Boar's Head Inn in Eastcheap by 1867.
Hill Evans was the largest producer of British Wine by 1868, with an annual output of 130,000 gallons.
Hill Evans constructed a small private railway branch in 1870, which linked it to the Great Western & Midland Railway.

The third generation enter the business
Thomas Rowley Hill and Edward Bickerton Evans retired from the business in 1874, and distributed a bonus of £1,173 among their 118 employees. They were succeeded by Edward Wallace Evans (1847 – 1901), Thomas William Hill (1843 – 1898) and Edward Henry Hill (1849 – 1911).
Edward Wallace Evans was an excellent businessman, and much of the subsequent growth of the firm was credited to him.
Hill Evans was accounted the largest vinegar brewery in the world in 1881, based on its annual production of two million gallons a year. A single mash tun had a capacity of 12,307 gallons. There were eleven fermenting vats, each with a capacity of 15,000 gallons. All told, the brewery had a storage capacity of 500,000 gallons of vinegar. The brewery held more than 100,000 casks.
Thomas Rowley Hill died in 1896. He left a personal estate valued at £170,322.
The works covered over six acres by 1900. The brewery had an annual capacity of 1.5 million gallons of vinegar, and was probably the largest business of its kind in Britain.
Hill Evans becomes a limited company
Hill Evans became a limited company from 1900, with a share capital of £150,000. The conversion allowed the business to pay out the share of the company owed to Thomas William Hill, who had recently died.
Edward Henry Hill became chairman and Charles William Dyson Perrins (1864 – 1958) of Lea & Perrins joined the board of directors.
In later life Edward Wallace Evans suffered from gout in his hands, and bandaged his hands in cotton wool on the advice of his doctor. Evans attempted to light a cigar whilst reading a letter, and accidentally set the wool alight. Evans suffered serious burns, and died from shock in 1901. Curiously, he left a relatively modest net personalty of £10,876. The only son of Edward Wallace Evans appears to have played no active part in the business.
The works covered around seven acres by 1907. Exclusively English grain was used for brewing. The company probably still had the largest vinegar brewing capacity in the world.
Edward Henry Hill died in 1911 and left a net personalty of £147,081. A generous benefactor, he died unmarried.
[It says unmarried here but in the census forms he was married to Agnes Elizabeth (Bailey) Hill - and was a widower]
.
Increased competition saw the company suffer from reduced profitability in the early 1960s. Hill Evans lacked the scale of its larger rival British Vinegar.
Hill Evans entered into voluntary liquidation in 1967, and the vinegar works were closed. The Grade II listed vinegar works building was then used by the Territorial Army as of 2019.

 

19th Century Engraving of Worcester Vinegar Works, showing the railway system that was built for moving all the goods to Shrubhill station.

 

 

Home ©peh